Duct Tape for the Win.

Sunny is what I would call accident-prone. If there is any possible way that she can hurt herself, she will do it. It’s not usually life-threatening, or even very serious, but she’s the kind of horse that could cut herself in a padded stall.

So the first time I noticed an odd little nick on her front left fetlock, I wasn’t overly concerned. I did what I always do – cleaned it out, put on a little purple spray, and forgot about it. The next day, she came in with two of these nicks – one on each fetlock. Same routine. By the third day, they had become full-blown open sores, and I started to get worried. I just couldn’t figure out what was happening. She lives in a very safe stall, with a very safe paddock, and there was nothing I could find that would be causing these injuries.

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So, I did what any responsible horse owner would do – I took to the internet in search of “what causes sores on fronts of fetlocks”.

Well, as it turns out, the problem is in the way she’s lying down. Actually, more to the point, in the way she’s getting up. Now, Sunny’s no spring chicken. She’s twenty-three this year, and has a lot of arthritis in her poor old hocks and knees, so it’s not surprising that she has a bit of a hard time getting up and down. We filled her stall up with more bedding (on top of her rubber mat), and hoped that would do the trick. Of course, it didn’t. Sunny’s stall opens up into her paddock, and she is free to come and go as she pleases. Since she wasn’t necessarily lying down inside, filling up her stall might not have any effect at all.

My barn owner, Darlene, and I wracked our brains to try to figure out a way to protect Sunny’s fetlocks. Because we didn’t know if she was doing it at night or in the daytime, and because she spends most of her time outdoors, standing bandages weren’t an option. She was already wearing bell boots almost 24/7 because of some shoeing changes we were in the midst of making, but they didn’t cover the area where Sunny was getting injured…

And then it hit me. Sure, her bell boots didn’t protect her in their proper application. But turned upside down, they provided all the coverage Sunny needed to keep her fetlocks wound-free. An easy fix, as well as a great conversation piece whenever someone visited the barn (interesting side note – people for the most part are oddly apprehensive about pointing out that your horse’s boots have been put on completely upside down).

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Problem solved. Or so we thought. Within a matter of days, the sores began reappearing, this time on her knees. We were back to the old drawing board, except a little worse off than before because, well, have you ever tried finding a way to protect a horse’s knee without bandaging it? Especially a horse who basically lives outside? Not so easy.

Again I took to the internet, and found a few different options. One was these cool “socks for horses”, but it turns out the ones that are good for covering wounds don’t go up over their knees, and the ones that go up over their knees aren’t good for covering wounds. Another idea, which I thought was ridiculous and would never work, was covering the wound with duct tape. And the third option, pricey but appealing, was a pair of Back on Track knee boots.

So I temporarily used the duct tape method, and immediately ordered a pair of Back on Tracks from Amazon. I was very interested in how whether they could pull double duty, protecting her knees while at the same time providing a little heat therapy for her arthritic old legs. Well, I was right one one count.

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The moment I put them on, I could tell Sunny liked them. She got a soft, dreamy look in her eye, and began to lick and chew the same way she does when I’m scratching her favourite itchy spot on her belly. Happy with my new purchase, I turned her out with them on, and asked Darlene to take them off when she came out to do night check. Which she did. Although they weren’t actually covering Sunny’s knees anymore by night check. They had made their way down around her ankles, and were protecting nothing.

Back to Google, to search “how to keep Back on Track knee boots from sliding down”…

Almost every review I read about these boots talked about the fact that they were hard to keep from sliding down, and the preferred method of holding them up seemed to be standing wraps. Which we had already established that we were uncomfortable using. The next day I made a trip to our local Greenhawk store and purchased a nice pair of Stretch & Flex wraps. We then applied the knee boots to her knees, and the Stretch & Flex wraps underneath to hold them up. Which looked great…

 

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But, of course, by the next morning they had slipped down quite a bit. And since it’s been snowing, and they’ve been getting wet, they’ve been slipping down even more, to the point where the knee boots are once again down around her ankles most mornings. We even tried putting the Back on Track boots on upside down, which had been suggested as a possible way to make them stay up, but to no avail.

Then I thought back to that couple of days while I was waiting for the Back on Track boots to arrive. I remembered that the duct tape method, which had sounded so sketchy to me at first, had actually worked. I mean, it wasn’t pretty… but it had worked. So yesterday morning, I got out my duct tape, gauze and scissors, and fashioned Sunny the prettiest little duct tape knee protectors I could. All of the folks in the internet forums had suggestion cutting two long strips and applying them in an X shape over the gauze. So that’s what I did.

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And you know what? It kinda works! Once again proving the following three truths that are known to horse owners the world over:

  1. There aren’t many problems for which duct tape isn’t a viable solution;
  2. Sometimes less really is more;
  3. Make it in pink and mare owners will buy it.

Have you ever had a horse with knee sores? How did you treat them?

 

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One Reply to “Duct Tape for the Win.”

  1. What a fascinating article. Isn’t this horse ownership in a nutshell? Try this, try that, buy this piece of equipment, try turning it upside down, layering it with something else, repurposing it, taping it in place…and in the end, you use a simple solution like duct tape. In pink. Love it!

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